CBD Drastically Reduces Social Anxiety Symptoms

Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder, or SAD, is one of the most common anxiety disorders which has varying degrees of severity.  Symptoms can range from mild discomfort, in certain social situations, to severe panic attacks.  Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the prominent chemical components within the hemp plant and has been shown to have anxiolytic effects, which reduces anxiety, in both animals and humans.

Researchers in the Department of Neuroscience and Behavior, within the School of Medicine, at the University of São Paulo, in Brazil, conducted a study to evaluate the effects CBD had on patients suffering from SAD.  In a double-blind study involving 24 volunteer SAD patients, half received CBD (600mg, 90 minutes prior to testing) while the other 12 received a placebo.  There was a separate group of 12 healthy, non-SAD subjects, which acted as a control group.  All volunteers were subjected to a simulated public speaking test and were scored several ways, both subjective and physiological.  Subjective testing included a Visual Analogue Mood scale and a Negative Self-Statement scale while the physiological tests measured blood pressure and heart rate multiple times throughout the speech.

The results from all tests were clear: pre-treatment with CBD drastically reduced symptoms of SAD during the public speaking test.  Anxiety, cognitive impairment and physical discomfort, during speech performance, dropped significantly compared to the SAD patients who had not been administered CBD.  The test results of SAD subjects, who received CBD, were comparable to the non-SAD control group.

Individuals suffering from the discomfort of Social Anxiety Disorder often use substances, such as drugs or alcohol, to numb themselves when their SAD is triggered.  Cannabidiol could offer a healthy solution, providing effective symptom relief, with no known risk of addiction.  We look forward to continued research on how CBD can help people struggling with varying types of anxiety disorders.

To read more about the study at the University of São Paulo, please click here.